Tag Archive: Play


Image result for the assassination of katie hopkinsThe provocative title alone suggests that this new musical aims to stoke discussion and reaction, and it offers up a plethora of issues for debate. Centred around the hypothetical murder of famous loud-mouth Katie Hopkins, Assassination boldly explores the nations’ reaction to the death of the divisive public figure. The sensational title itself is a reflection of the controversial columnist’s style. You would be forgiven for initially expecting this play to be an attack on Hopkins, with the storyline perhaps acting as a dark fantasy for those against her outlandish and often offensive views. However, this is not the case. This is a clever, well-thought-out production. Assassination is by no means a love-letter to Katie Hopkins, but it is also not afraid to defend her.

The play actually does not feature Katie Hopkins as a character, but uses her controversial persona to explore what she stands for. Essentially, Assassination is about free speech. Through a mash-up of vox pops, ‘live’ interviews, CCTV footage and voicemails (all performed by a highly skilled cast), we hear the stories of Kayleigh and Shayma. Young journalist Kayleigh is tasked with the tough job of composing a dossier of good deeds carried out by Hopkins, following her death.  Through her investigations she begins to see Hopkins as a strong, confident woman who had a firm grasp of her own views and wasn’t afraid to share them. Though Kayleigh makes it clear she doesn’t agree with some of the opinions Hopkins expressed, she begins a campaign to remember Hopkins for who she was and not what she said. Alongside this, we see the story of Shayma, a trainee Lawyer who is frustrated by the media coverage for Hopkins’ death, which completely overshadows a tragic chain of events that led to the death of 13 migrant workers on the same night. Both narratives weave seamlessly around each other and against a backdrop of venom from those who hated and supported Hopkins.

Assassination is a refreshing, original production. The set consists of two screens which present the live TV interviews, CCTV footage, transcripts of phonecalls and singing emojis. For a show with such a huge concept, the set and staging is all very minimal. With just these screens and a handful of props, the cast and crew manage to recreate the hi-tech world of the internet where the story can unfold.

The complex strands of the plot are pulled tightly together by an incredible cast. Each actor takes on multiple roles with ease and, amazingly, makes each one easily identifiable just through their performance. Amy Booth-Steele is instantly recognisable as Theresa May despite not looking anything like her or even mentioning her name. Kirby Hughes also deserves recognition for her excellent performance as she was a late addition to the cast, taking over part way through the run. Hughes’ performance was slick and finely tuned, the only the clue to her joining the cast during later stages being the insert in the programme. As a small ensemble, the cast worked perfectly together to bring this story to life. The natural delivery of the lines, with actors talking over each other and self-correcting, really stood out and provided some very genuine moments.

Despite the click-bait title, The Assassination of Katie Hopkins is not what it might seem. It is not just a retaliation by offended lefties. This is an intelligent discussion, an exploration of free speech that covers all bases. We experience the fallout of Hopkins’ death from the perspective of the perpetually furious, the seemingly mild-mannered but secretly-smug liberal, those who form an opinion just to plaster it across Twitter, and those too terrified to comprehend what Hopkins’ death means for them.

In world where hate can be spread at the touch of a button, this is a vibrant, modern production with an important message, that deserves a wider platform.

Advertisements

Right, it occurred to me that this year I have seen a lorra lorra theatre and, ridiculously, have only written about a few shows. So to catch up, this week I’m giving you four fast reviews for the productions I missed, but really did deserve to be talked about…..

Wonderland, Venue Cymru, LlandudnoImage result for Wonderland the musical

I’ll start with Wonderland because it’s got a bit of a tragic story.  I saw this in Llandudno in June and it was spectacular. Wonderland is the familiar story of Alice given a modern twist. Alice is a 40-something divorcee with a teenage daughter who enters Wonderland via a dodgy lift in her apartment block. She doesn’t take the trip alone as she’s joined by daughter Ellie and awkward love-interest Jack. Whilst in Wonderland they’re encouraged to go through the looking glass, a magical archway that exposes the other side of their personalities (cue Alice becoming stern and sensible and Jack transforming into a confident charmer.)

Wonderland boasted many memorably songs, particularly ‘Through the Looking Glass’ and ‘Finding Wonderland’, sung with passion and energy by a very talented cast. Rachael Wooding was a powerhouse as Alice, revealing Alice’s faults and insecurities poignantly. Bree Smith gave a cracking performance as the sassy Queen of Hearts, slaying with her performance of ‘Off with their heads’. Ben Kerr and Francesca Lara Gordon were also brilliant as the March Hare and Mad Hatter, giving us refreshing twists on the classic characters. The set pieces were gorgeous, fully immersing into the crazy world of Wonderland where anything is possible. Most striking was the way the famous tale of  Alice was re-worked into a modern setting, giving the characters (particularly Alice) a bit more depth along the way. Wonderland was a work of art and must-see, modern musical.

However, just a couple of weeks after seeing Wonderland, the tour was cancelled due to problems behind the scenes. There’s plenty of speculation online, but, whatever the reason, it’s a great shame that the hard work, commitment and talent of the cast and crew will go unseen.

Les Miserables, Queen’s Theatre, London

Image result for les miserablesThis was a bucket-list show that lived up to all of my expectations, and beyond. The star of the show is its musical score and I was not disappointed to hear Claude-Michel Schönberg’s music played by a live orchestra. ‘At the end of day’ saw the full cast launch into action with breath-taking harmonies whilst ‘Do you hear the people sing?’ gave the audience goosebumps you could strike a match on. Simon Gleeson was made for the role of Jean Valjean, whist Hollie O’Donoghue was perfect as Eponine, giving a beautiful performance of ‘On My Own’. Katy Secombe and David Langham stole every scene as the dastardly Thenardiers, providing much needed comedy amongst all the tragedy! The revolving set works really well, seamlessly taking the story across France and through the ages. The battle sequence in the second act is particularly stunning, with tense performances (and gun fire!) keeping the audience well on the edge of their seats. At one point it took all my will not to cover my eyes. The deaths during this battle scene are especially heart breaking (no spoilers), and many gasps were heard as the barricade revolved to reveal the true carnage. Les Miserables remains packed with emotion throughout and it ends in spectacular fashion with the beautiful finale. There’s no question as to why this show has been around for so long. It’s a must-see and a show that I’m sure I’ll revisit.

Don Juan in Soho, Wyndham’s Theatre, LondonImage result for don juan in soho

Sex, drugs and David Tennant – what’s not to love? Though, admittedly, the main pull to this production was, initially, that is starred a certain former Time Lord, I was pleasantly surprised to find a sparkling script and stellar performances waiting for me at Wyndham’s Theatre. Updated to 2017 and relocated to Soho, Don Juan tells the story of a privileged, hedonistic party-goer as he sleeps his way around London, picking up plenty of hookers and cocaine along the way. David Tennant was, of course, fantastic as the titular bastard, unleashing his inner-Russel Brand and being fantastically horrid to every other character, including his loyal aid, Stan, played excellently by Adrian Scarborough. The relationship between Stan and DJ is surprisingly endearing, though Stan, on the edge of a breakdown, is desperate for DJ to pay him so he can retire, he can’t help but stay by DJ’s side. Don Juan in Soho is strikingly contemporary, with references to the ‘strong and stable’ government we find ourselves trapped under today as well as several witty remarks about American politics. DJ deliciously berates the world we live in, stating social media, fake news and lying politicians as factors of a crumbling society in one passionately performed monologue that had the audience on the verge of shouting ‘Amen!’. DJ tries to explain to Stan that life is all about pleasure – shamelessly seducing the chavtastic Lottie (a brilliant comic performance from Dominique Moore) in a hospital whilst simultaneously trying it on with grieving bride Mattie in one ridiculously outrageous scene. Don Juan in Soho was theatre at its best as it forced the audience to think before they left their seats. It was engaging from the first moment, topical and surreal, and definitely one of the best plays I’ve ever seen.

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time, Venue Cymru, Llandudno

Image result for the curious incident of the dog in the night-timeA really touching story told in a refreshing, and visually brilliant, way. Christopher finds his neighbour’s dog has been killed and takes it upon himself to solve the mystery. His mission sees him uncover a family secret, which in turn takes him to the terrifying world of Central London. Scott Reid was phenomenal as Christopher, giving a truly powerful performance, particularly as Christopher’s condition begins to take control. The modern and tech-heavy set pieces drew us in to the story using clever effects (a green box giving the effect of a football match on TV, a remote control train bringing London to life before our eyes) to add an extra fizz to the already sparkling performances. Surprisingly, Christopher has uncovered the culprit by the interval, leaving the second act to explore the secrets of Christopher’s family and the effects his ‘behavioural problems’ have on his loved ones. Anyone who doesn’t feel prickly-eyed throughout Act 2 is incapable of emotion. The emotional energy of the performances is sometimes borderline unbearable, and the sequences in London are also quite overwhelming, as we experiences flashing lights, loud noises and almost nightmarish scenes, we’re forced to view the world from Christopher’s point of view. This is a play that will stay with you long after you’ve left the theatre.