Category: Theatre


Would I go to West End Live again? HELL YES!

I’ve wanted to go for years and this year I finally made it happen, and after following the hype on twitter for weeks, I was more than ready to soak up the stagey awesomeness in Trafalgar Square on Saturday.

Thankfully, I was up early and had my place in the queue just after 8am (two hours before the gates opened). Apparently, the queues were soon stretching right up to Leicester Square and when I left the event at 2.30pm, there were still people waiting to get in, which is a testament to the popularity of the event.

Just like Comic Con, West End Live has a very comfortable vibe. Everyone there loves theatre and no one is there to judge. You can belt the words to ‘Defying Gravity’ or join in with the exact choreography to ‘All That Jazz’ (and people did) and no one will bat an eyelid.

My early start paid off as I managed to grab an excellent spot. Sitting on the wall of a fountain I had a clear view of everything happening on the main stage and the stage right screen. Presenters Tom Price and Ruthie Henshall did a great job introducing all the acts, starting with the cast of Everybody’s Talking About Jamie, who kicked the day off with a burst of energy and fabulousness.

It’s impossible to choose a favourite act. Adrienne Warren from Tina was a highlight, fully embracing Tina-isms to a point where a passer-by would have been forgiven for thinking Queen Turner was performing. Trevor Dion Nicholas from Aladdin knows how to work a crowd and whipped the excitement up with his trademark charisma. (How is he not constantly exhausted?) The Dreamgirls cast delivered powerful vocals, particularly as they passionately sang ‘Listen’. Then there was the cast of Mamma Mia who had the whole crowd singing along to ‘Dancing Queen’ in a moment of pure, unapologetic campery that had everyone waving their arms in the air. Alice Fearn delivered an incredible ‘Defying Gravity’ from Wicked and the audience went crazy when she walked on stage in full Elphaba costume.

It was the cast of Bat of out Hell who really rocked Trafalgar Square though, with an energetic medley of songs from the new hit musical. Andrew Polec was fantastic and proved to be very charming during an interview after his performance. Bat of out Hell is definitely high up on the list, now.

Will Young introduced his show, Strictly Ballroom, and lead performers Jonny Labey and Zizi Strallen who wowed with their impressive moves….but more on that next week!

There was also a surprise appearance from Matt Willis who has joined the cast of Little Shop of Horrors as the evil Dentist, Orin. There was also serious Ab-envy towards most of the cast of Chicago who, in my opinion, where too greedy with their ab muscles and should consider sharing them with the ab-less, such as myself.

Each performance was so amazing – even the very few shows that were at the bottom of my ‘to-see’ list have risen to the top thanks to their routines. Unfortunately, I had to leave at 2.30, but thanks to the wonder of youtube I was able to catch the acts I missed and the quality certainly did not diminish as the day went on.

Of course, no visit to London would be complete without a pit stop at the theatre café and I celebrated in style with a green tea in a Wicked cup (well what else would you put in a Wicked cup?)

So after years of planning to go and not quite making it due to one thing or another, I finally made West End Live. Celebratory jazz hands all round!

Advertisements

Image result for a streetcar named desire theatre clwyd

‘I don’t want realism! I want magic! Yes magic!’

Isn’t that why we all go to the theatre? Escapism with a touch of magic. Well perhaps A Streetcar Named Desire wasn’t the ideal play for my Friday night escapism. Having been some years since I studied the play at university, I was vaguely familiar with the plot but the modern day production by ETT at Theatre Clwyd added a fresh new take Tennessee Williams’ classic play. Theatrical magic, yes, but a darker and more disturbing magic than I anticipated. The twisted story of desperation, pretence and vulnerability left me with a bitter taste in my mouth and provided plenty to think about well into the weekend.

Image result for a streetcar named desire theatre clwydStreetcar is the story of troubled southern belle Blanche Dubois who wrestles with her past and insecurities as she stays with her sister, Stella, and brother-in-law, Stanley. It’s clear from Blanche’s arrival that she is running away from trouble but as the events catch up with her, and she is confronted by Stanley, the plot takes a sinister turn, leading to the productions most uncomfortable sequence. The brutality of Stanley’s actions left the audience numb and it was hard to sit and watch as the set was stripped bare to reveal Blanche screaming under a burning hot shower.

Patrick Knowles plays Blanche’s attacker, Stanley. A beer-swigging lads-lad who is desperate to state his masculinity over his wife and sister-in-law. In this production, there is no sympathy for Stanley. The Brando charm has well and truly gone, and Knowles plays Stanley with an arrogance and childishness that could be found at many local boozers.Image result for a streetcar named desire theatre clwyd

The set design for this production is basic but effective. The two rooms that we see on stage provide a claustrophobic pressure-cooker for the action to unfold. The use of music is extremely effective, as distorted versions of ‘Heart of Glass’ by Blondie provide a soundtrack to Blanche’s unravelling and Madonna’s ‘Material Girl’ injects a small moment of fun before Stanley literally pulls the plug on it.

The relationship between Stella and Blanche, played by Amber James and Gough respectively, seems slightly forced initially but becomes more believable as the play grows. Blanche’s fierce protectiveness over Stella is evident as she tries to convince her to leave Stanley, and it’s hard not to feel sorry for Stella by the end of the play, as she loses her sister and finds herself trapped with a violent lover.

The stand out performance comes from Gough though. The final sequence of her leaving the shower and breaking down in the apartment makes for very uncomfortable viewing and it must have been a tough place for Gough to visit night after night. As Blanche is taken away, the distorted, hazy mindset of Blanche is portrayed well by the staggered blocking of the cast and sharp bursts of disjointed dialogue. Gough plays her vulnerability and raw fear in this sequence in a way that haunts you well after the lights have faded.Related image

Image result for the assassination of katie hopkinsThe provocative title alone suggests that this new musical aims to stoke discussion and reaction, and it offers up a plethora of issues for debate. Centred around the hypothetical murder of famous loud-mouth Katie Hopkins, Assassination boldly explores the nations’ reaction to the death of the divisive public figure. The sensational title itself is a reflection of the controversial columnist’s style. You would be forgiven for initially expecting this play to be an attack on Hopkins, with the storyline perhaps acting as a dark fantasy for those against her outlandish and often offensive views. However, this is not the case. This is a clever, well-thought-out production. Assassination is by no means a love-letter to Katie Hopkins, but it is also not afraid to defend her.

The play actually does not feature Katie Hopkins as a character, but uses her controversial persona to explore what she stands for. Essentially, Assassination is about free speech. Through a mash-up of vox pops, ‘live’ interviews, CCTV footage and voicemails (all performed by a highly skilled cast), we hear the stories of Kayleigh and Shayma. Young journalist Kayleigh is tasked with the tough job of composing a dossier of good deeds carried out by Hopkins, following her death.  Through her investigations she begins to see Hopkins as a strong, confident woman who had a firm grasp of her own views and wasn’t afraid to share them. Though Kayleigh makes it clear she doesn’t agree with some of the opinions Hopkins expressed, she begins a campaign to remember Hopkins for who she was and not what she said. Alongside this, we see the story of Shayma, a trainee Lawyer who is frustrated by the media coverage for Hopkins’ death, which completely overshadows a tragic chain of events that led to the death of 13 migrant workers on the same night. Both narratives weave seamlessly around each other and against a backdrop of venom from those who hated and supported Hopkins.

Assassination is a refreshing, original production. The set consists of two screens which present the live TV interviews, CCTV footage, transcripts of phonecalls and singing emojis. For a show with such a huge concept, the set and staging is all very minimal. With just these screens and a handful of props, the cast and crew manage to recreate the hi-tech world of the internet where the story can unfold.

The complex strands of the plot are pulled tightly together by an incredible cast. Each actor takes on multiple roles with ease and, amazingly, makes each one easily identifiable just through their performance. Amy Booth-Steele is instantly recognisable as Theresa May despite not looking anything like her or even mentioning her name. Kirby Hughes also deserves recognition for her excellent performance as she was a late addition to the cast, taking over part way through the run. Hughes’ performance was slick and finely tuned, the only the clue to her joining the cast during later stages being the insert in the programme. As a small ensemble, the cast worked perfectly together to bring this story to life. The natural delivery of the lines, with actors talking over each other and self-correcting, really stood out and provided some very genuine moments.

Despite the click-bait title, The Assassination of Katie Hopkins is not what it might seem. It is not just a retaliation by offended lefties. This is an intelligent discussion, an exploration of free speech that covers all bases. We experience the fallout of Hopkins’ death from the perspective of the perpetually furious, the seemingly mild-mannered but secretly-smug liberal, those who form an opinion just to plaster it across Twitter, and those too terrified to comprehend what Hopkins’ death means for them.

In world where hate can be spread at the touch of a button, this is a vibrant, modern production with an important message, that deserves a wider platform.

Image result for Hairspray UK

On the surface, Hairspray is a vibrant shot of colourful campery. But after my trip to Venue Cymru on the weekend, I found myself delving a little deeper into a musical that provided the soundtrack to my later teens.

After first seeing Hairspray in London in 2007, thoughts of comparing that wonderful production to the latest tour scratched at my mind from the moment ‘Goodmorning Baltimore’ began. Although this production was a fine incarnation of the bouncy,  but far-from-fluffy musical, it paled slightly in comparison to the original London run. It felt like I was watching a watered down version. However, there were still plenty of gems to enjoy.

Whilst Rebecca Mendoza gave a comedic, gurning take on Tracey Turnblad, her portrayal erred on the side of panto. The clearly rehearsed ‘spontaneous laughter’ between Norman Pace and Matt Rixon as Wilbur and Edna added to the pantomime taste that wasn’t so apparent in the original London production. Though they were both excellent in their roles, but the panto-banter sort of let their big duet down.

I felt Brenda Edwards should have been perfect casting for the role of Motormouth Maybelle, but although she blew the audiences socks off every time she sang (hitting each note with pitch-perfect ease), she chose to portray a gentler, simpering side to Maybelle that I didn’t expect. Maybelle is a strong and confident woman. Queen Latifah played her! Her name is ‘Motormouth’ for God’s sake! Edwards seemed to lack bolshiness to really deliver in her role. This only really shone through when she sang.

Layton Williams was a delight as Seaweed, slaying ‘Run and Tell That’ with his trademark backflips and mid-air splits. Gina Murray also wowed as Velma Von Tussle, giving new depths to the campy villain. Having seen Tracy Bennett play Velma perfectly in London (and of course the wonderful K-Cheno in Hairspray: Live), I was skeptical about whether Murray would be able to bring anything new to Velma, but she added a new confidence and sexiness to the character. She didn’t hit one wrong note during any of her songs.

Don’t get me wrong, this was a big bundle of fabulous fun, great family entertainment for a Saturday night, but the production fell foul to the increasing trend of projected set pieces. I can see how it lowers and eases production costs but to me it just waters down the whole production and, unfortunately, cheapens it. Perhaps I’m being unfair by comparing it to a previous production. In it’s own right, this is an excellent performance but it’s only when looking at previous incarnations that the cracks begin to appear.

Finally, let’s talk about the ending. I’m sure before the 2007 movie everyone was thrilled that Tracey wins Miss Teenage Hairspray. But surely anyone watching the stage version post-movie will be more than disappointed that it’s not Inez who takes the crown. Many noticeable additions from the movie appear in the stage show but the ending remains unchanged. After listening to the strong messages of the show for two hours, it just doesn’t sit right that the white girl gets the glory.

Image result for ruby wax frazzled

‘If you’re in the Maldives but all you can think about is the office, you might as well save your money.’

Ruby Wax dropped into Theatre Clwyd last week. We went expecting comedy, and Ruby provided plenty of that, but we also left bolstered by a great sense of positivity, support and intelligent discussion.

The focus of Wax’s latest tour is her most recent book, ‘A Mindfulness Guide for the Frazzled’. Ruby’s story is an inspiring one. Years of depressive episodes lead to a breakdown several years ago which spurred Ruby on to investigate what makes her brain tick. Having successfully acquired a masters in Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy from Oxford University, Ruby has begun spreading the word of her recovery (though she makes it clear it is very much still a work in progress) and coming to the aid of others.

Image result for ruby wax frazzled

As someone who has experienced anxiety since a child, a lot of messages from Wax’s tour (and book) seem to finally put my own frustrating feelings into words. For example, Wax talks about how our brains haven’t caught up with our bodies when it comes to our evolution, and our minds simply can’t cope with the hectic lifestyles we live today. On some level, our minds still work in a primitive state, constantly attending to our survival. She talks about how the endless lists and information from our complex lives clog up our brains, which are exhausted from sorting the useful information from the trivial. As someone who is constantly feeling like they are sprinting on life’s treadmill, sweating away and about to fall off, this makes a lot of sense.

‘We are dropping from exhaustion from no other reason than we are trying to keep up with next guy…..who’s keeping up with the next guy, who’s heading toward a full nervous breakdown.’

Wax talks about social media and its impact on our wellbeing. Though she is openly pro-technology, she emphasises the stress social media puts on our relationships and need to be ‘successful’.

The main message of Wax’s tour and book is to be present. To take time out from our busy schedules to stop and fully experience what is going on around us. At the theatre, Wax gave us some handy tips to help slow our minds down and tune ourselves in to the present moment. Although the Antony Hopkins theatre is quite large, Ruby created an intimate and relaxed atmosphere, openly taking questions form the audience and not being afraid to digress into an anecdote. Ruby likens mindfulness to a muscle in the brain which must be exercised each day in order to reap the benefits. As we left the theatre, there was a feeling of hope and positivity, as many of the audience admitted to experiencing some level of mental illness. Through her unique charisma and personal experiences, Ruby had gently encouraged the audience to keep going and understand that they are not alone. This was more than a comedy show, as we left armed with plenty of food for thought and a clearer idea of what mindfulness is all about.

Image result for Aladdin the musical

A last minute dash to the West End resulted in Saturday night at the Prince Edward Theatre. Disney’s Aladdin was spectacular – a bouncy, vibrant musical and a special treat for any fan of the Disney film.

Everything from the set pieces to the costumes is big, bold, and classic Disney, screaming Disney from the moment the curtain rises. The decision to add extra characters, such as Aladdin’s friends, does sit a bit oddly at first but his pals prove their likeability during the second act.

This script fizzes with wit in moments, mostly during the Genie’s scenes, however it does feel slightly panto in parts, particularly during Jafar and Iago’s front of curtain scenes. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing, especially given the shows target audience are children, but it does seem a bit unexpected,  when compared to Disney’s other hit, The Lion King.

Aladdin was played with heroic charm by Antony Hewitt and Jade Ewan was perfect as Princess Jasmine. Admittedly, the Genie is the star of the show. Just as the first act is starting to dip, the lamp is rubbed and out pops Trevor Dion Nicholas with his fast-firing jokes and impressive magic tricks. ‘Never Had A Friend Like Me’ is the definition of a show-stopper with an extended arrangement, extravagant tap routine, vanishing male lead, and appearing showgirls, all accompanied by a riffing genie. It’s enough to leave even the Disney-adverse humming the chorus days later.

It’s not just the Genie’s magic that adds an extra special charm to the production. There were ooohs and aaaahs a plenty when the magic carpet actually floated around the stage with not a string in sight. It took a bit of googling to discover how it’s done, but the clever use of modern tech adds a whole new world of magic to the show.

Overall, Aladdin is a dazzling diamond in the West End. A real cave of wonders.

Related image

Image result for miss saigon I walked into the Palace theatre knowing nothing about Miss Saigon, but I left with a haunting soundtrack flickering through my mind. Whilst the story of Miss Saigon is simple, Sooha Kim and Ashley Gilmour make stunning work of captivating the audience as Kim and Chris. I was struck by how quickly the audience cared about them, particularly Kim, whose naivety and innocence is performed beautifully by Sooha Kim. Whilst the doomed romance between Kim and Chris makes for plenty of drama, it’s the score that gives Miss Saigon its real power. From the dramatic opening as Kim’s village is attacked to the thunderous rumblings of the finale, each song whips up the tragedy and emotion perfectly. ‘The Last Night of the World’ was the only song I was familiar with prior to watching, but the intense crescendo of the song wasn’t the only musical piece that left me with goosebumps. Gilmour gave a vulnerable performance during ‘Why God Why?’ and Kim’s ‘I Still Believe’ was pitch perfect in every way.  But it wasn’t all drama – thankfully Red Concepcion was on hand to provide some light relief as the sleazy Engineer, delivering every vulgar comment with extra grease. This was a production where every cast member was giving their all – even the helicopter earned a round of applause!

The most poignant theme of Miss Saigon isn’t the heart-breaking relationship between Chris and Kim, but the desperate lengths Kim will go to in order to protect her son, Tam. It’s a story about the strength of love, but not necessarily the story you were expecting.

 

Right, it occurred to me that this year I have seen a lorra lorra theatre and, ridiculously, have only written about a few shows. So to catch up, this week I’m giving you four fast reviews for the productions I missed, but really did deserve to be talked about…..

Wonderland, Venue Cymru, LlandudnoImage result for Wonderland the musical

I’ll start with Wonderland because it’s got a bit of a tragic story.  I saw this in Llandudno in June and it was spectacular. Wonderland is the familiar story of Alice given a modern twist. Alice is a 40-something divorcee with a teenage daughter who enters Wonderland via a dodgy lift in her apartment block. She doesn’t take the trip alone as she’s joined by daughter Ellie and awkward love-interest Jack. Whilst in Wonderland they’re encouraged to go through the looking glass, a magical archway that exposes the other side of their personalities (cue Alice becoming stern and sensible and Jack transforming into a confident charmer.)

Wonderland boasted many memorably songs, particularly ‘Through the Looking Glass’ and ‘Finding Wonderland’, sung with passion and energy by a very talented cast. Rachael Wooding was a powerhouse as Alice, revealing Alice’s faults and insecurities poignantly. Bree Smith gave a cracking performance as the sassy Queen of Hearts, slaying with her performance of ‘Off with their heads’. Ben Kerr and Francesca Lara Gordon were also brilliant as the March Hare and Mad Hatter, giving us refreshing twists on the classic characters. The set pieces were gorgeous, fully immersing into the crazy world of Wonderland where anything is possible. Most striking was the way the famous tale of  Alice was re-worked into a modern setting, giving the characters (particularly Alice) a bit more depth along the way. Wonderland was a work of art and must-see, modern musical.

However, just a couple of weeks after seeing Wonderland, the tour was cancelled due to problems behind the scenes. There’s plenty of speculation online, but, whatever the reason, it’s a great shame that the hard work, commitment and talent of the cast and crew will go unseen.

Les Miserables, Queen’s Theatre, London

Image result for les miserablesThis was a bucket-list show that lived up to all of my expectations, and beyond. The star of the show is its musical score and I was not disappointed to hear Claude-Michel Schönberg’s music played by a live orchestra. ‘At the end of day’ saw the full cast launch into action with breath-taking harmonies whilst ‘Do you hear the people sing?’ gave the audience goosebumps you could strike a match on. Simon Gleeson was made for the role of Jean Valjean, whist Hollie O’Donoghue was perfect as Eponine, giving a beautiful performance of ‘On My Own’. Katy Secombe and David Langham stole every scene as the dastardly Thenardiers, providing much needed comedy amongst all the tragedy! The revolving set works really well, seamlessly taking the story across France and through the ages. The battle sequence in the second act is particularly stunning, with tense performances (and gun fire!) keeping the audience well on the edge of their seats. At one point it took all my will not to cover my eyes. The deaths during this battle scene are especially heart breaking (no spoilers), and many gasps were heard as the barricade revolved to reveal the true carnage. Les Miserables remains packed with emotion throughout and it ends in spectacular fashion with the beautiful finale. There’s no question as to why this show has been around for so long. It’s a must-see and a show that I’m sure I’ll revisit.

Don Juan in Soho, Wyndham’s Theatre, LondonImage result for don juan in soho

Sex, drugs and David Tennant – what’s not to love? Though, admittedly, the main pull to this production was, initially, that is starred a certain former Time Lord, I was pleasantly surprised to find a sparkling script and stellar performances waiting for me at Wyndham’s Theatre. Updated to 2017 and relocated to Soho, Don Juan tells the story of a privileged, hedonistic party-goer as he sleeps his way around London, picking up plenty of hookers and cocaine along the way. David Tennant was, of course, fantastic as the titular bastard, unleashing his inner-Russel Brand and being fantastically horrid to every other character, including his loyal aid, Stan, played excellently by Adrian Scarborough. The relationship between Stan and DJ is surprisingly endearing, though Stan, on the edge of a breakdown, is desperate for DJ to pay him so he can retire, he can’t help but stay by DJ’s side. Don Juan in Soho is strikingly contemporary, with references to the ‘strong and stable’ government we find ourselves trapped under today as well as several witty remarks about American politics. DJ deliciously berates the world we live in, stating social media, fake news and lying politicians as factors of a crumbling society in one passionately performed monologue that had the audience on the verge of shouting ‘Amen!’. DJ tries to explain to Stan that life is all about pleasure – shamelessly seducing the chavtastic Lottie (a brilliant comic performance from Dominique Moore) in a hospital whilst simultaneously trying it on with grieving bride Mattie in one ridiculously outrageous scene. Don Juan in Soho was theatre at its best as it forced the audience to think before they left their seats. It was engaging from the first moment, topical and surreal, and definitely one of the best plays I’ve ever seen.

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time, Venue Cymru, Llandudno

Image result for the curious incident of the dog in the night-timeA really touching story told in a refreshing, and visually brilliant, way. Christopher finds his neighbour’s dog has been killed and takes it upon himself to solve the mystery. His mission sees him uncover a family secret, which in turn takes him to the terrifying world of Central London. Scott Reid was phenomenal as Christopher, giving a truly powerful performance, particularly as Christopher’s condition begins to take control. The modern and tech-heavy set pieces drew us in to the story using clever effects (a green box giving the effect of a football match on TV, a remote control train bringing London to life before our eyes) to add an extra fizz to the already sparkling performances. Surprisingly, Christopher has uncovered the culprit by the interval, leaving the second act to explore the secrets of Christopher’s family and the effects his ‘behavioural problems’ have on his loved ones. Anyone who doesn’t feel prickly-eyed throughout Act 2 is incapable of emotion. The emotional energy of the performances is sometimes borderline unbearable, and the sequences in London are also quite overwhelming, as we experiences flashing lights, loud noises and almost nightmarish scenes, we’re forced to view the world from Christopher’s point of view. This is a play that will stay with you long after you’ve left the theatre.

Image result for the addams family musical uk

‘Darkness, grief and unspeakable sorrow.’

Well…not quite. Darkness, yes, but there were plenty of laughs at the WMC in Cardiff on Friday night. I’ve been reading a lot on twitter about The Addams Family musical so I was really excited when, by pure luck, I bagged two tickets for last Friday.

As the orchestra struck up the familiar theme tune, what was initially clear was just how well cast this show was. Samantha Womack is a perfect Morticia – cool and sultry throughout – whilst Cameron Blakely makes a terrific Gomez. Both actors have sizzling chemistry together (proven with a sexy tango) and match each other with each witty punchline. They both resurrect these iconic characters perfectly. Perhaps surprisingly, ‘Love’ is a key theme of this production, most prominently the love between a family, and Blakley shows Gomez’s love for his daughter,Wednesday, beautifully, particularly during the song ‘Happy/Sad’, where he reflects on the memories he has of his young daughter, such as the first time she set fire to the Jehovah’s witness, evoking the dark humour we associate with the family.  (Another example, when Alice asks if the Addams’ have a little girls’ room, Gomez responds with ‘We did, but we had to let them go.’)

At first, Wednesday’s (Carrie Hope Fletcher) change of character is a bit awkward, but all becomes clear when Wednesday belts her showstopper number ‘PRelated imageulled’, explaining that her change is a result of her love for Lucas. As the show progresses, it becomes clear Wednesday’s sadistic side is still lurking as she tortures her brother and gets very excited about potentially shooting Lucas in the head with her crossbow (all in the name of love, of course).

Valda Aviks was also fantastic as Granny, particularly during her ‘Full Disclosure’ speech. It was a smart move to address the ambiguity around Granny’s connection to the family from the cartoons and movies, by having Morticia refer to her as Gomez’s mother before Gomez retorts with ‘My mother? I thought she was your mother?’.

 

Les Dennis gave a great performance as Fester and his story thread of being in love with the moon was typically ‘Addams’ and, at the end, quite sweet. Dickon Gough also deserves a mention for his scene-stealing performance as Lurch. Lurch doesn’t speak but became a clear audience favourite thanks to Gough’s comic timing and surprising hip action in the finale number. (One complaint – where was Cousin itt?!). The main cast are supported by an excellent cast of ancestors, complete with choreography reminiscent of Thriller.

As well as the familiar quirky characters, the show boasts a catchy score. Andrew Lippa nails the new music and each number feels very natural to the characters. In particular, the opening number ‘When you’re an Addams’ is a definite ear worm and the final number, ‘Move towards the darkness’, will haunt you after you leave your seat.

What’s also impressive is the way the gothic Addams mansion is brought to life on stage via moving staircases and hidden entrances. The suspended moon above the Addams family home creates an eery and dramatic scene.

Overall, The Addams Family is a treat for theatre fans with a gorgeous score, fantastic visuals and a stellar cast.

Watch the opening number here

Watch the trailer here

Related image

Image result for 42nd street londonI had an unexpected and very last minute trip to London last week.  Amongst the walking, talking and dining, I found myself at the Theatre Royal for a surprise tap-dance down 42nd Street.

I had very few preconceptions about the show, and I didn’t really have time to consider it too much, but I knew I was in for an old-fashioned, high-kicking performance. Four rows from the front, I had perfect seats (courtesy of TodayTix rush tickets) which gave a great close-up view of the stage.

The shows standout quality is its sheer spectacle. The sets and costumes are absolutely dazzling and during several musical numbers it’s hard to be anything but totally absorbed. The lights, moving set pieces, harmonies….It really is mesmerising. During one sequence a huge mirror is lowered to firstly, reflect the audience, and then tilted to show the dancers lying on the stage floor carrying out a very intricate synchronised sequenced. It was so impressive even the mirror got a round applause!

Tom Lister and Gabrielle Lewis-Dodson gave great performances as theatre producer Julien Marsh and clumsy chorus girl Peggy Sawyer. Sheena Easton was also brilliantly bitchy as the acerbic actress Dorothy Brock. I really enjoyed Jasna Ivir’s performance of Maggie Jones, delivering her witty one-liners with perfect comic timing (On musicians ‘Let’s just say they’re in a pit… and there’s a reason we keep them there!’)Image result for 42nd street london

Musically, the show boasts lots of catchy numbers, many of which I wasn’t familiar with until I’d seen the show, but caught myself humming many times since. ‘Go into your dance’ and ‘42nd Street’ are big tap numbers that get the audience going, but it’s ‘The Lullaby of Broadway’ that really steals the show. Ear worms a-plenty in this show!

The overall plot, a chorus girl getting her big break in a huge Broadway show, is a bit flimsy in parts, particularly some of the songs in the ‘Pretty Lady’ musical (What is the plot of that show?!), but that doesn’t distract from the energy and passionate performances of the cast.  42nd Street is a spectacular night out of good old fashioned West-End magic.

Watch the trailer here