Category: Doctor Who


When Chris Chibnall took over as showrunner for Doctor Who, he promised big changes. Leading lady aside, the biggest shift has seen Chibnall restore Doctor Who to it’s original, more educational, state. Gone are the story arcs. Gone are the over-complicated plots. Gone are the heavily CGI-ed sequences. Doctor Who is now about humans, more than aliens, and its mission is to educate.

Twitter is full of dailymailers ranting how the show has become too ‘politically correct’ and ‘preachy’. What I see is a show that is constantly changing, and, although the changes this time are far more than subtle, it is simply undergoing another of it’s countless changes. Doctor Who has always educated and it has always been political. It has always dealt with massive themes, like Faith (Gridlock), slavery (Planet of the Ood), and loss (Death in Heaven). If there’s one show that is not afraid to shy away from a difficult conversation, it is Doctor Who.

This series, so far, hasn’t been perfect, but that is to be expected of a show that has just regenerated. Like the Doctor, it needs time to discover itself. It has, however, delivered some spectacular moments. The on-going strand of Ryan and Graham’s grief has given us some touching moments. It could have been easy for Grace’s death to act as a plot device, sending Graham and Ryan on their way with the Doctor, with Grace hardly being mentioned again. But its a bold move to show these characters taking their time to deal with their grief.

The stand-out episode, so far, has been ‘Rosa’. Parks’ inspirational story carries a very important message – one person can change the world. It was uncomfortable to see Ryan and Yaz experience the ugliness of prejudice, but I think it was important that the show didn’t sugar coat it. In 1955, that is exactly the treatment they would have received. Moved by the episode, I mentioned it to a group of my year one children, who had seen the episode. As part of our topic, ‘Famous Faces’, I decided to talk about Rosa Parks to the class. At first I was tentative, as I was worried it would be a difficult and upsetting story for a 5 year old to handle. But, I had underestimated them. We watched a BBC re-enactment of the story, which was met with stunned silence. The children weren’t upset, but they recognised the injustice instantly. Some of them couldn’t understand why white people would want to be segregated from the black people. They all understood the unfairness of the situation. They went on to describe Rosa as ‘brave’, ‘smart’ and ‘caring’. The discussions that have followed have been some of the most meaningful I have witnessed in the classroom. It was a shock for the children to learn that our history has not always been pleasant, but it was an important lesson that will hopefully arm them with important values against injustice and prejudice.

So, OK, Doctor Who has changed, but if it is opening children up to these kinds of conversations then it can only have changed for good.

Advertisements

Image result for the ghost monument gifLast week’s breath-taking cliff-hanger is quickly resolved in the first few seconds of episode two, ‘The Ghost Monument’. The Doctor and her new buddies are ‘scooped’ up by separate, conveniently passing space ships, and are soon reunited on an abandoned planet, worryingly named Desolation.

This week’s episode is visually very appealing, with beautiful of shots of the treacherous planet (from deserts to carnivorous lakes to fields of snow.) The gang’s narrow escape from a bunch of weapon-branding robots also adds plenty of adrenaline. We don’t see many aliens this week, and we still get a very strong feeling our new protagonists are just being sketched out. I can’t help feel the writers are still holding something back.  However, it is very early days and what we are seeing so far is showing potential.

We do get two huge treats this week in the form of the brand opening sequence, which is awesome, and the Doctor’s reunion with her TARDIS. Any fan who wasn’t jumping for joy when the TARDIS materialises, clearly isn’t a fan. Whitakker continues to portray the Doctor beautifully, and her joy at being reunited with her ship is lovely. We finally get to see the interior, which is very Tennant-era. Chibnall has been notorious for keeping secrets and the TARDIS interior was effectively revealed during the episode. It’s all proving very promising for rest of the series.

‘The Ghost Monument’ has a decent plot, possibly stronger than last weeks, though it is a character piece, fleshing out our new friends. The element of peril comes from the Doctor and companions caught up in a space race and stranded on an alien planet. Bradley Walsh gives a Cribbins-esque performance as lovable granddad Graham. His strained relationship with Ryan seems to mean a tear-jerking future moment where Ryan finally calls him granddad is inevitable. We still need to see more of Yaz, though we do learn a bit about her family. Hopefully her character will be further explored next week. Guest appearances are good, with Shaun Dooley and Susan Lynch playing bickering racers Angstrom and Epzo.

On the whole, ‘The Ghost Monument’ is a strong second episode, giving us some further background to the Doctor’s new companions, some interesting hints at a possible arc (another mention of the Stenza) and some awesome imagery.

Image result for the woman who fell to earth

Growing up, I was the friend who ‘liked Doctor Who’. It was my thing. My quirk, at first, until I slowly converted the majority of my pals. Tennant was my Doctor, but I did have a soft spot for Smith. Capaldi was brilliant, but, although I hate to admit it, the last few seasons left me disappointed. We were promised a ‘snarling beast’ but I always felt like Capaldi’s Doctor fell just shy of that, and was more of a cantankerous grandad.

But the beauty of the programme is, like its protagonist, it can regenerate.

The pre-episode nerves were rife across twitter as we waited anxiously for Jodie Whittaker to make her debut. It’s always an edgy time, but with a new producer, new cast, new doctor, new…well…everything, but this time the stakes felt particularly higher.

But Jodie pulled it off.

It felt like a new programme, but without losing that quirky warmth that Doctor Who does so well. Jodie Whittaker was perfectly bonkers as the Doctor, with stand-out moments being her arrival on the train, crashing straight into the action, and of course the moment we’ve waited over a year for, a-top of a crane, proclaiming to the World that she is the Doctor. I’m sure every fan let out a squeak of joy as the familiar rumblings of the theme tune played out over Whittaker’s arrival. In her opening episode alone, Whittaker gives us some cracking moments that hint at the awesomeness of her Doctor. She makes her own sonic screwdriver! Brilliant!

The Doctor is supported by a fab new collection of companions. Bradley Walsh gives a great performance as the lovable Graham, though Walsh himself is a such a big personality that it is sometimes hard not to see him as ‘Bradley Walsh’. I’m sure, judging by his first episode, he’ll continue to bring his charm and charisma to ‘Graham’ as the series continues.

Tosin Cole and Mandip Gill give strong performances as Ryan and Yaz, although we still have a lot to learn about them, particularly the latter.  Judging by their first episode, they’ve made a promising start.

Sharon D Clarke was fabulous as Graham’s wife (and Ryan’s Nan), Grace. Though my heart sank when it dawned on me that she was the only one of the Doctor’s new friends who wouldn’t be travelling in the TARDIS. Her thirst for adventure and her determination to keep Ryan out of danger seemed to be the final nail for this character, and it became obvious she was doomed. However, this is Doctor Who, so perhaps it’s not the end for Grace…

It’s also worth a mention that new theme tune sounds totally kick ass, and I’m sure every fan is desperate for a glimpse of the new title sequence next week. With new adventures, a new team and the new TARDIS yet to be revealed, it’s going to be an exciting few weeks!

 

Image result for torchwood the victorian ageSomething magical has happened. After years in a Torchwood-drought, I have discovered Big Finish. Creating original Torchwood audio-stories, the seven plays I’ve heard so far have been fantastic, and an excellent consolation to the lack of Torchwood on TV. It has been great to welcome Gwen, Ianto, Jack and Rhys back, as well as characters who played a smaller role in the TV series, such as the formidable Yvonne Hartman who makes a gloriously sassy return in Torchwood: One Rule. The story arc of the Conspiracy has proved to be interesting, especially as each episode focuses on the Conspiracy from various viewpoints and in differing depth. One minor thing to complain about is the lack of answers to the Conspiracy plot thread. In a couple of episodes it’s not even mentioned and I’m hoping we get more answers in the next few releases.

My most recent adventure with Big Finish, Torchwood: The Victorian Age, was one of my favourites. The story features Captain Jack Harkness on secondment to Torchwood London (based beneath the Natural History Museum) in the early days of the institute. It’s a real character piece for Jack and enables us an insight into his life before he ran our beloved Cardiff branch. He’s still the same old Jack; battling danger with the usual cheeky swagger and charm. Though there is the small matter of taking care of Queen Victoria that’s making Jack sweat.

After witnessing the outbreak of a deadly creature, Queen Vic invites herself along on the chase and gives Captain Jack a run for his money as she helps to save the world. As a staple part of Torchwood canon, it’s good to have the founder of the institute interact with Jack and have her own adventure. Rowena Cooper gives a top-notch performance as the monarch, delivering her scathing lines with no-nonsense, stiff-upper-lip Britishness that makes you want to cheer ‘Rule Britannia!’.  It’s also nice to see the softer side to Queen Victoria (as we first glimpsed in the Doctor Who episode ‘Tooth and Claw’) as she comforts the mother of an injured girl, and through her growing respect for Captain Jack.

The themes of regret and loss run deeply through the story and there are plenty of references to living and enjoying the time we have left on Earth. Putting an alien that can cause de-ageing at the touch of its hand against a Queen who is frustrated by her age and desperate to rule her beloved country for longer, is an interesting concept. Just like the TV series, Torchwood reminds us that life is for living and Jack continues to emphasise how dangerous his job is. ‘There isn’t always another time,’ he gently warns Queen Victoria, echoing the ethos of the programme.

Victorian Age is classic Torchwood. It my be on a new platform but it’s still the same cheeky, but deadly, Torchwood, full of fan-favourites and bonkers scenarios. Because of course, only Captain Jack Harkness could destroy an alien whilst flirting with it.

 

Image result for spoilers river song gif

I’ve always been partial to a good surprise. I was one of those children who secretly hoped for a surprise party or who would hint heavily to his friends that his birthday is just around the corner and wouldn’t it be lovely if everyone in his class sang to him? (Note: Rest assured, I’ve grown out of that.) I love surprising people too. I like to see their faces when I give them a meaningful gift or organise a treat for them. I’m a big fan of surprises – they break the monotony.

A few Christmases ago, my mum decided to tell me weeks before the big day that she had bought an iPad for me and I went ballistic. I was totally grateful for the cracking gift but I was furious that she spoilt it! Part of the joy of Christmas is the excitement and build up and she had casually demolished the mystery! Ooof! I was annoyed….

So, it’s probably not a surprise that I am totally anti-spoiler when it comes to TV. I don’t watch much TV, so the shows that I do watch mean a lot to me. And it means a lot to me that those programmes aren’t spoiled. I present to you, Case Study One: EastEnders.

Sometimes, particularly in these upcoming cold, dreary winter days, the thought of getting home, putting on my pyjamas and watching EastEnders (and thinking ‘Well, at least my life isn’t that bad…’) is all that makes the day bearable. I haven’t missed an episode for about three years. I know it’s a sad fact, but nevertheless, it is true. This week was a big week for EastEnders, with plenty of shocks and surprises promised. There was a lot of hype and, I admit, I was a bit excited. So you can imagine my disappointment when all the shocks and surprises were announced before transmission. I spent the whole week sighing and tutting as another storyline unfolded in the predictable or previously announced way. It shouldn’t have been boring, but it was. (OK, there were a lot of things wrong with last week’s episodes, but I maintain the stance that if everything had been kept secret I would have enjoyed the episodes a lot more.) Why do shows feel the need to leak everything beforehand? Alright, there is an argument that I shouldn’t go looking for spoilers, but we’re in an age now where even logging onto Twitter or Instagram can ruin a show for you – I didn’t have to look far. In the last few years, under the previous Executive Producer, some of the best storylines were transmitted by surprise. Look at the 30th Anniversary episode – they brought back Kathy. Iconic and memorable and a total shock. So, EastEnders, stop spoiling things for your fans! You CANNOT hype up a mystery ‘major character death’ and then, days later, announce an actor is leaving and not expect us to put two and two together. We’re not stupid.

On the topic of Twitter, I was getting increasingly agitated by the constant stream of spoilers in my news feed for Game of Thrones (which also happens to be Case Study two, for those of you keeping score of that). I understand people want to talk about it when they’ve watched it but what I don’t get is the need to spoil it for everyone. You don’t need to tweet (in detail) about it. You certainly don’t need to record clips from episodes into a snapchat story!! (I actually had to block someone for this – What kind of monster does something like that?!). Digital Spy also seem intent on spoiling it for others by revealing spoilers in their article titles or, even worse, writing a vaguely mysterious title about a possible death in the episode then spoiling it with a picture of the dead character in question! Stop! I will read your article but let me watch the bloody episode first!

There was a time when, keen for more information on plots and such, I would have gone looking for spoilers online but I have since discovered the art of watching spoiler-free. The 50th Anniversary of Doctor Who taught me this can be a very rewarding experience. I enjoyed the episode so much more because I didn’t know what was coming and I was able to immerse myself properly. The same goes for the last season of American Horror Story. Despite each episode airing in the USA days before the UK, I was able to avoid spoilers and it made the season for me. I was totally obsessed with the show and it made me want to tune in each week. If I’d known what was happening, I’d have just been tuning in out of habit or to prove my findings correct, which isn’t quite the same experience.

My earliest memory of spoiler-rage is set in the school canteen. (This could be Case Study three, but to be honest, I’ve sort of lost track of that). I was (and still am) a huge Harry Potter fan and I used to buy each new book the day it was released, then spend as many hours as possible reading. I’d take the books everywhere – I’d read in the car, in the bath, in school during lunch time, and during 90% of the time I spent at home. I’d invested so much time in these stories and I really cared about what was happening. So, imagine my absolute (hormonally-assisted) meltdown when a girl in the dinner queue casually told everyone that Sirius dies in the fifth book. I was just pages away from the heart-breaking moment, and to hear it being announced (so proudly, by someone who hadn’t even read the sodding book) sent me into a rage! If she thought it was a good idea, she was gravely mistaken. ‘Oh! Thank you! Thank you very much for revealing that bit of information and saving me the trouble of finishing the book I’ve spent the last 48 hours reading during every waking moment. Phew! For a minute I thought I was going to have to enjoy it!’

Urgh. It still makes me cross. I can hold a grudge.

I don’t understand this necessity to prevent people from enjoying something you have had the privilege of enjoying. If you have watched something awesome, why would you want to spoil it for someone else? The guy who streamed Game of Thrones over his snapchat story – what was he benefitting from that? EastEnders weren’t benefitting anything from their pre-publicity reveals. If they’d have kept some mystery people might have watched to find out the answers.

So there are no positives to spoilers. The clue is in the name. It spoils everything. So stop it. Stop it right now!

Image result for Pink Ranger gifWhen I was a child I was obsessed with Power Rangers. Many weekends were spent high kicking and karate chopping in the garden attacking imaginary Zed Putties. My favourite ranger was the Pink Ranger. I thought she was awesome and kick-ass. I didn’t even think about her suit colour or the fact I was a different sex to her.

I just thought she was great.

My mum and dad did not approve and I was bluntly pushed towards the blue ranger with all the subtlety of Rita Repulsa’s transition to Dad-Eye-Candy in the new film. (Whole different blog post there.) But regardless of what my parents thought, I still thought she was great and, in a very child-like way, she was a bit of hero for me (until I grew out of my Power Rangers phase).

And then as I got into my teens the Doctor came along, bringing with him a range of heroes and role models for me to fantasise about (Errm…excuse me. Not like that.). How awesome was Rose? Loyal and quick-thinking. Donna Noble – hilarious, sensitive, self-less and selfish at the same time. Awesome characters – I wasn’t going to pretend I didn’t like them just because I’m a guy.

I was sixteen when Torchwood started and I was instantly obsessed. Part of the pull for me was the relatable characters – including Gwen and Toshiko, both fearless and flawed, making terrible decisions but fighting their way back on top and learning from their errors, however painful.

I didn’t think that because they were women I shouldn’t admire them. And who wouldn’t want Storm’s powers in X-Men? She’s brilliant!

So, my point is, it shouldn’t matter what gender your favourite TV character is. I’ve got girls in my class who love Spiderman, but somehow that is a bit more acceptable in society than a boy who likes Wonder Woman or Elsa or Clara Oswald. It shouldn’t be. One girl in my class LOVES Doctor Who, she’s actually obsessed with Matt Smith and David Tennant. If a six year old child is able to look past gender then so should adult fans of the show. A female Doctor has been on the cards for long time and, judging by how incredible Missy turned out to be, I’m looking forward to seeing Jodie Whittaker’s take on the time lord. A role model is a role model and gender should not be a factor. We admire these characters for their personalities and their responses to various situations, so there’s no reason we should be discouraging boys from watching Doctor Who now that the main character has changed sex.

Image result for Doctor who female gif

Well I think we can all agree that this week’s episode of Doctor Who was terrifiying. Set on a troubled space station, Oxygen saw the Doctor, Bill and Nardole arrive to answer a distress signal. As if dealing with the space-zombies (dead astronauts being carried around by their smart-suit) wasn’t enough, they also had to deal with the lack of oxygen. Stressful stuff.

It feels like the Doctor has been travelling to increasingly darker territories since the show’s return in 2005. We’ve had everything from face-consuming gas masks to shadows that will eat you alive but it seems the show is still finding new ways to make us shudder.

Whilst Russel T Davies injected fresh new life into Doctor Who, it’s been Steven Moffatt who is responsible for giving it that chilling streak. Since the beginning of his reign we’ve had the Weeping Angels (terrifying!), Dream Crabs (bloody terrifying!) and the Silence (Oh good God, I’d forgotten about those!) – all suitably creepy enough to give us nightmares. But is this what Doctor Who is about? There’s plenty of criticism online that recent series’ have been too dark and scary for children and there’s lots of people who would like to see it return to its warmer, family-friendly roots.

Take Oxygen. I have to admit, I was freaked. The imagery of the dead astronauts stomping around the space station was effectively eerie, an image I can’t imagine many children will be forgetting in a hurry. But, to me, that’s what it’s all about. Yes, I like watching the Doctor travelling to different planets and having banter with his companions but I also like it when it scares me. When I’m still thinking about it as I go to bed. The Doctor lives a dangerous life and it does the audience good to be reminded of that. It’s not all Oods and Robin Hood. One of the most powerful sequences in this episode was the moment Bill is exposed to the vacuum of space. The peril felt real, aided by a great performance from Pearl Mackie. Bill’s genuine fear throughout the episode came across really well, adding to that feeling of unease as you watch from behind your cushion. Then, ofcourse, the suckerpunch of episode came as the Doctor paid a price for his adventures and lost his sight. Grim stuff.

It’s not just the monsters. We’ve been hit with a different kind of scary several times in recent series as the show has proved it can do psychological terror pretty well too. For example, the words ‘Don’t cremate me’ are enough to give you goose bumps. Doctor Who is able to show us just how awful our own world can be, because anything is possible in the Whoniverse, even the most horrendous of situations.

But should Doctor Who tone down the fear factor? Of course not! Classic Who is remembered most for being terrifying (if a little shoddy on the special effects) so NuWho is simply bringing that thread into 2017. It’s a rare breed of show that has a license to do whatever it wants, so it should always be finding new ways to scare us. The best episodes are the ones we’re stilling thinking about and shuddering days later. Doctor Who should always have the ability to send us diving behind the sofa.

Image result for Doctor Who scary gif

A few weeks ago I had a burst of inspiration. I was adding to old material and creating new work for what felt like a whole week solid. It was just pouring out of me and I couldn’t (and didn’t want to) stop it. The last few weeks that wave of creativity has truly crashed and become a pathetic dribble of vague ideas, all due to that frustrating mess of distractions – life. In the past, when I’m struggling, I find I can take inspiration from music. I’ve said before that music is a large part of my life and, aside from the stuff I might sing along to in my car, I’ve got a bank of music I turn to if I want to jump-start a story in my head. Below are five of, what I think, are the most inspirational musicians for writing (as well as providing dramatic soundtracks for your day….or am I the only one who does that?)

Murray Gold – I’m a Doctor Who fan and Murray Gold’s soundtrack comes with a whole TARDIS full of inspiration. Tracks such as ‘The Master Tape’, ‘The Majestic Tale of the Madman with a Box’ and ‘The Rueful Fate of Donna Noble’ are awesome kick-starters for a dramatic showdown or fully-charged finale. A lot of Reset was written with Murray Gold’s series 4 soundtrack blasting in the background, particularly tracks from latter episodes. Not only has he composed some deliciously dramatic pieces, but his tracks, such as ‘The Dream of a Normal Death’, ‘Goodbye Pond’ and ‘The Long Song’ can also be beautifully poignant. I’ve used Murray Gold’s music to inspire my own work but I’ve also played it many times in the classroom to inspire creative writing (and the children always love it). It’s also worth noting that Gold has composed some wonderful incidental pieces for Torchwood, such as ‘Death of Toshiko’ which always makes me a bit damp around the eyes.

Scala & the Kolacny Brothers – I first heard their take on U2’s ‘With or Without You’ some years ago on an advert for Downton Abbey. It was such a haunting piece of music that I had to find out more, and I’ve since added their versions of ‘Use Somebody’, ‘Heroes’ and ‘Every breath you take’ to my writing playlist. Nothing quite tops ‘With or Without You’ when it comes to sending shivers up your arms, though.

Michael GiacchinoLost was one of my favourite TV shows and, apart from the bonkers characters and quirky mysteries, I loved it for its music. My favourite piece of incidental music from Lost is ‘Moving On’. I love how it rises and falls, from soft and gentle to a breath-taking crescendo that just makes you cry! (It’s also great for calming down rowdy Year 6s, I’ve found). Giacchino is also behind some amazing scores from films such as Up and Jurassic World.

John Williams – Speaking of Jurassic World/Park, I had to include the film’s original composer, who created that iconic theme tune (and, alright, I may have been guilty of playing it at full blast as I’ve driven around Wales). Whether you’re into dinos or not, it’s really difficult not to get excited when the music swells. Of course, Williams is also famous for the Star Wars soundtrack, which is equally as inspiring for dramatic writing.

Alan Menken – Responsible for creating some classic Disney tunes, I had to include Menken’s work. Regardless of the catchy songs, Menken’s back catalogue of instrumental scores alone is worthy of this list. From The Little Mermaid to Tangled , Menken has created many breathtaking pieces of music. One of my favourites is ‘Transformation’ from Beauty and the Beast. (Close your eyes, have a listen and feel happy!)

Image result for doctor who series 10 titles gif

So it’s back. I always forget just how much I’ve missed Doctor Who until those opening titles of a new series roll out.  Series 10 kicked off on Saturday with the introduction of a brand new companion – Bill Potts. After the initial intro clip last year I wasn’t too sure about Bill. She came across as a bit too cartoony and goofy and I could see her being very annoying very fast. However…(wait for it….rare moment coming up) I was wrong. Bill definitely made her mark in her premiere episode – showing that she was an intellectual match for the Doctor and adding a fresh new dynamic on board the TARDIS.

Bill is a new kind of companion. She sees things from a view point we’ve not had before. (She even asks the classic question in a different way – ‘Doctor what?’) She is refreshing for many reasons but mostly because of her humanity. I loved Clara, but by the end of her run if felt like she was saying the same things over and over again. The same quizzical expression. The same sarcastic comments. The same sort of cutesiness. Bill is different. Bill isn’t afraid to call the Doctor out on his faults – which of course Clara was happy to do too – but I can imagine Bill doing it with a bit less sass. She’s honest, grounded and flawed. She’s just a bit more human! The ways she’s written comes across so naturally. Perfect qualities for a classic companion. Bill also had one of the best introductions to the TARDIS, with the lights slowly booting up as the camera pans out…..only for her to liken it to a kitchen (its’ true) and a lift (also true). In her first episode she experiences heartbreak as she is forced to let Heather go. Her strength, complexity and emotional depth in these scenes are promising. It’ll be interesting to see how her story unfolds…

One thing that did stick out as odd was the re-appearance of Nardole. Nardole seems to have just…happened! Probably due to the large gap between his introduction in the 2015 Christmas special and his more recent appearance last Christmas.  Nardole just doesn’t quite seem to work yet. Still, I’m hopeful a satisfying explanation as to why the Doctor has him sticking around will be revealed as the series rumbles on. Though at the minute it does sort of feel like Moffatt is keeping him so he can kill him off in the finale (he’s promised it will be a ‘bloodbath’.)

The Pilot demonstrates one of the shows keys themes – regeneration. Doctor Who has the gift of being able to overhaul everything once things start to get a bit stale. It’s great to keep things fresh and allow a ‘stepping on’ point for new viewers….but what about old viewers? Doctor Who has gone through a lot of changes over time, particulary since it’s return in 2005, and next year will see the show have a new Executive Producer, a new Doctor, a new look and possibly a new companion. So did we really need this new revamp so soon? Sometimes the constant changing between series’ can be off putting to those who want to immerse themselves into a story they have already invested so much in. It can be a bit frustrating when the reset button keeps being pushed. Take Capaldi’s Doctor, for instance. This is only the beginning of his third series and he has transformed so much. He’s gone from grouchy and dangerous to a wise old grandfather figure. What happened to the snarling beast Moffatt promised after Matt Smith’s regeneration? I’d have liked that process to take a little longer, to have really been explored. It’s a shame this is to be Capaldi’s last series as his Doctor hasn’t really had much chance to shine.

So, overall a good opening episode but I’m hopeful for a bit less re-booting and a few more references to the show’s history in future episodes. Having pictures of River Song and Susan on the Doctor’s desk was a nice touch. The new TARDIS dynamic is going to give us some interesting moments in the lead up to Capaldi’s exit. I think it’s gonna be a good one.

Image result for doctor who series 10 titles gif

My countdown continues! Below are my top eight most WTF moments in NuWho. Allonsy!

Number 8 – Oswin Oswald, Asylum of the Daleks, Series 7.

We kneImage result for Oswin Oswald gifw Jenna Coleman was the new companion but didn’t expect her to pop up alongside Amy and Rory in Asylum of the Daleks. OK, she wasn’t playing Clara Oswald but Oswin Oswald, who turned out to be a version of Clara….confused? Well this brings me on to…..

 

Number 7 – Clara’s secret finally revealed, The Name of the Doctor, series 7.

We’d been guessing for months as to who on Earth Clara Oswald was and The Name of the Doctor finally revealed her true identity which was…..Clara Oswald. Not some sinister force sent to destroy the Doctor or a forgotten Timelord, as some speculated, but an ordinary Earth girl. At the end of the episode she rescues the Doctor by stepping into his timeline, scattering herself across his many lives, thus explaining why she kept popping up in previous episodes. Clever! The cold-open of this episode is gasp-inducing enough with the many references to the Doctor’s past faces, but, just to push any fan over the edge, we’re then hit with the arrival of the War Doctor played by John Hurt! Boom! Fangasms all round.

Number 6 – ‘I don’t want to go’, The End of Time, Part 2

The death toll was ringing for the Tenth Doctor for what seemed like years, but on New Year’s Day 2010 the mystic Ood in the snow finally sent him to his maker. After visiting several of his favourite companions, the Tenth Doctor stumbled into the TARDIS and began to regenerate, delivering one final heart-breaking line. As with many of the Doctor’s best moments, this was made extra-special by Murray Gold’s incredible soundtrack.

Number 5 – Rose’s death, Doomsday, Series 2.

‘This is the story of how I died.’Image result for rose tyler bad wolf bay gif

Drama queen Rose sets the story off to a happy start, leaving viewers on the edge of their seats, knowing this was Billie Piper’s last episode (or so we thought). The battle of Canary Wharf with Torchwood, Daleks and Cybermen, ensured the second series ended with a bang, but the WTF moment came as Rose was sucked closer to the void opening, only to be rescued at the very last minute by her fake-Dad from a parallel universe. Sealed in Other Earth, Rose gets one last chance to say goodbye to the Doctor in Bad Wolf Bay. No one needs reminding of that beach scene. *sniff* but the Whoniverse did do a great big sigh of relief as Rose survived in another world, but technically dead in this one.

Number 4 – ‘You Are Not Alone’, Gridlock, Series 3. 

Gridlock is an underrated episode. A simple idea – The Doctor and Martha visit New Earth only to find the majority of New New York’s citizens are trapped on an underground motorway and have been for many years. It’s in this episode that the Doctor starts to reveal his past to Martha, explaining how the rest of his species were killed and he is now the last of his kind. Most of the action takes place within various vehicles, but key themes of belief and hope are powerfully conveyed. The scene where drivers take part in the ‘daily contemplation’ is very moving. It all ends with the Doctor over-riding the motorway system, freeing everyone who is trapped and allowing them to rebuild the city. He’s helped by the Face of Boe, who shares his final secret with him before he dies – ‘You Are Not Alone’. Enigmatic, right?

Number 3 – The 50th Anniversary, The Day of the Doctor, Special episode.

Months of teasers and guesswork led to this massive episode. Event television at its finest. The Day of the Doctor had lots of references to the history of the show, as well as setting up the return of Gallifrey for future episodes. Long awaited shots of the time war were spectacular and the returns of David Tennant, Billie Piper, Jemma Redgrave, Tom Baker and the Zygons satisfied viewers around the world. Throw in a secret Doctor (played to perfection by John Hurt) and an impossible choice and you have an emotionally charged celebratory episode. (Note: We also get introduced to Osgood in this episode and she is several kinds of awesomeness.)

Number 2 – Melody Pond, A Good Man Goes to War, Series 6.Image result for a good man goes to war gif

Mid-season cliffhanger alert! Professor River Song’s (AKA The Doctor’s wife) identity was finally revealed during this episode. Showing up just as the Doctor has lost the battle of demon’s run, with Amy and Rory’s new baby, Melody, being kidnapped by the genuinely terrifying Madam Kovarian, River tries to console the grieving parents. Taking a prayer leaf embroidered with Melody’s name, River explains that the name (Melody Pond…with me?) translates as River Song. Thus revealing that through timey-wimey madness she is Amy and Rory’s daughter. Despite looking fifteen years older than them.

Number 1 – Everything, Turn Left/The Stolen Earth/Journey’s End, Series 4.

Nothing can top these three episodes. This was Doctor Who at its peak, for me. The end of RTD’s era saw a culmination of plot threats and great big mega-fan-wanky (his words, not mine) finale. Turn Left was a masterpiece, re-visiting events from the last few series from the perspective of Donna Noble (in my opinion, the best companion). We also got a glimpse of the dystopic nightmare world that exists without the Doctor. (Mass-death, concentration camps, segregation…not exactly a light and fluffy episode!) The final few moments where Donna reveals she’s met Rose Tyler (‘She said….two words….Bad Wolf’) still gives me shivers and then there’s the trailer for the next episode! I don’t think I’ve ever fangirled so much over a trailer. Flashes of all the favourite characters from past seasons and spin-off shows (Torchwood and The Sarah Jane Adventures) as well as a Red Dalek! Harriet Jones! Captain Jack! K9! All in one episode?! Christ, I was so excited. I’ve watched The Stolen/Earth and Journey’s End so many times I can almost quote it off by heart. The way all the characters play a part and threads are brought together so neatly is fantastic and a masterclass in storytelling. And then there’s that regeneration shocker! Catherine Tate is also at her peak in these episodes, proving Donna Noble is totally kick ass. By the end, you’ll be in tears.  Whether it’s at the Earth being saved (with that wonderful music), Donna Noble leaving the TARDIS in heart-breaking fashion, or just because you’re so bloody happy that everyone is together!

Image result for journey's end gif