A miracle has happened. We were plagued with the familiar panic-stricken reports of impending snowmaggedon but, as usual, we took notice and prepared for normal, dreary British weather. On Friday morning, I arrived to work with a just a small enough dusting of the white stuff to inconvenience my school shoes but by 8.15am the Head was flapping around the school spreading news of a possible closure. The yard was blanketed, teachers and pupils were stranded in their homes and the I ended up with a small handful of breakfast club children taking shelter in my classroom.

Everyone was home by 11am and, as is procedure, staff were encouraged to take work home. It was a nice change to catch up with my incerts and mark my books in front of the TV with the heating on full blast and a cup of hot chocolate on the table.

Our school doesn’t close easily, but we were one of 56 schools in the area to close Friday and Monday. I’ve seen and heard a lot of grumbling online about it being ‘pathetic’ that the schools chose to close up. I don’t envy Heads who have to make that decision. At 8.15am on Friday the snow was coming thick and fast but by 9am, when parents were leaving with their children, it had typically stopped. The Headteacher had to trust the forecasts and think ahead to later heavy flurries (which continued not only throughout Friday but across the weekend). Many cynical comments followed the school closures in our area, with one person asking me ‘Is it a safety thing, or something?’.

Well….of course it is! Believe it or not, the snow isn’t some conspiracy theory constructed by teachers so they can have a sneaky day off (we all took work home and were told not to go out!). Many factors contribute towards a school closure but the main focus of whole decision is obviously pupil safety. The Head not only had to consider staff ratios but judge whether it was worth asking parents to make the treacherous journey to school along icy roads with their children in the car.

Thankfully our parents were very understanding but online comments afterwards did bug me. I remember several snow days when I was younger. They’re memory makers. It might be a pain for adults who need to get to work but, remember, for a child it’s exciting! Going out and sledging with the family or even just staying inside and keeping cosy. It all adds a little bit of magic to the impending festive season.

To put my teacher hat on – think of the learning! Measuring the snow, discussing temperature, forming shapes and letters in the snow, the melting process – the list is endless!

Despite the temptation to cling to the central heating with a cup of tea, I forced myself to venture to the shop yesterday with my friend. It took us way longer than usual but it was hilarious. And it made the warm flat and hot mulled wine even more luxurious. Yes, it’s a bit of an inconvenience, but if you’re able to enjoy it then do so! We rarely get snow days so my advice is to just make the most of it, stop complaining and take a leave out of the childrens’ book – be excited!

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